Denmark

Braeraa Farm, Haderslev, Denmark

About the business

Started in

Taken over by Kim Kragh in 1994.

Braeraa farm has existed since 1780.

Livestock

3,000 fattening pigs (the pig housing is rented out)

Personnel

-

Area under cultivation

Kim Kragh farmed 1,200 ha until 2012.

Now 600 ha, of which:

310 ha winter wheat

160 ha spring and winter barley

130 ha rape

Crop rotation

Winter barley, winter rape, winter wheat, winter wheat, spring barley

Soil type

Heavy, partly clayey, silty loam soil.

Annual precipitation

800 mm

Machinery

1 AXION 810

1 AXION 840

1 XERION 3300 TRAC VC

(Following restructuring of the farm, the AXION 810 and XERION 3300 are being replaced by an AXION 930)

About Denmark

Population

5.5 million

Area

Approx. 4.3 million hectares (approx. 10.6 million acres)

Area under cultivation

Approx. 2.6 million hectares (approx. 6.5 million acres)

Number of farms

Approx. 42,000

Average farm size

63 hectares (156 acres)

In many areas national legislation imposes stricter requirements than EU directives.

 

There's just one thing that still gives him a headache sometimes – along with many of his colleagues in Denmark: the regulatory framework is very restrictive compared with the rest of the EU. "We want to protect nature and work with it. We are confident that we farm professionally and wish we were trusted more." Denmark sees itself as a pioneer when it comes to meeting the high European standards of animal, nature, environmental and consumer protection. What's more, in many areas national legislation imposes stricter requirements than EU directives. Citing an example, Kim Kragh explains: "For instance, the maximum nitrogen level that a Danish crop producer can apply is 140-160 kilograms per hectare, whereas in other European countries it is 170-230 kilograms per hectare."

"I expect my machinery supplier to provide excellent service and solve any problems that arise immediately."

 

For Kim Kragh, the ability to respond quickly and effectively is another essential part of his day-to-day work. Describing his requirements, he says: "I expect my machinery supplier to provide excellent service and solve any problems that arise immediately. And that's how I run my farm." He goes on to explain: "This is important because we couldn't manage without our machines." He has used CLAAS combine harvesters on his farm for many years and has been very happy with the support and service. "That's why I also chose CLAAS tractors. There were some challenges and problems in the early days, but they were always solved quickly and professionally."

 

Now he runs his farm on his own most of the time and also does all the work on a neighbouring 200-hectare farm as a contractor. The only thing he doesn't do is fertiliser spreading. If critical work peaks occur, he makes use of two former employees who are happy to help out on an hourly basis.

 

In Kim Kragh's experience, it has been even more important to carry out every operation at the right time since he switched completely to a no-plough system in 2002, after some successful experiments on individual fields. "This system needs a bit more management and attention in terms of weed and grass control, and you have to be in the right place at the right time for soil cultivation and drilling, so our machine capacity and muscle need to be ready at just the right moment," explains Kim Kragh, but "I'm getting better harvests, saving time and diesel and I have the impression that the fields are more trafficable."


Picture gallery


Making-of – Behind the scenes